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5 tips to help you get the salary you deserve

5 tips to help you get the salary you deserve

Posted on December 2019 By Nicholas Farley

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Congratulations! You have made it through the application process, the interview minefield and have now received an offer!

Relief is just about to kick in and then you realize that the daunting task of negotiating your salary is next on the list. Talking money and remuneration packages can often make people feel uncomfortable, so it is only natural that the thought of a discussion around salary can be daunting for interviewees. There is bound to be some apprehensiveness in the air, but here are 5 tips from debt advisory service Scottish Trust Deed to negotiate the salary you deserve.

1. What is your expected salary?...

Whilst you may be unsure of the questions which will be asked of you during your application process, “what is your current salary” is one that is as probable as any.

You may fear that your answer to this question gives the hiring manager the opportunity to present a lower salary than originally envisioned for the role. So, it is important to remember, you are not obliged to hand over this information.

However, it is often the case that your accountabilities and expertise needed in this new position is indicative of the prior experience and knowledge gained in previous roles. Therefore, the salary should always reflect the responsibilities for the specific position. A wise way to answer the question, ‘what is your expected salary’ is to answer ‘one that is a fair representation of the knowledge and experience needed for this role.’

2. …Well, off the top of my head

Fail to prepare, prepare to fail is the old saying. You should ALWAYS prepare your salary expectations before you’re in the interview setting. It is not a good look to be caught off guard, and you may say something you will regret, or even give off the impression you will accept any proposal.

Websites like Glassdoor can help you research roles that are similar and give you an idea on a median salary for the position in question. Speaking to a recruitment agency, like us, isn’t a bad idea either. We can give some guidance on the clarity and reality of the impending conversation.

3. So, this is awkward

Approach a salary negotiation with confidence.  Everyone has hopes when starting their career that they will receive a rewarding salary and the interviewer knows this.  Therefore, there is no reason to feel apprehensive when discussing your desired salary, and the lack of awkwardness will project confidence.

4. Is the experience worth more than the salary?

Sometimes it’s best to swallow your pride and accept the role if the salary is less than you were expecting, but the experience and accountabilities offered are rare. Sometimes, the experience is worth more than its weight in gold and it is important to look at the big picture for your future career prospects. 

5. More than just the money

Remember, all cards can be on the table for negotiations.  Work perks; bonuses, and annual leave are all things worth discussing and negotiating. In terms of gaining a work-life balance and quality of life, these can play a bigger part in your day-to-day life and happiness than a salary.

If you are seeking some guidance on salary conversations, currently looking for a new role and preparing yourself for the perspective interviews, or have had some success with the above tips - we would love to hear from you!

This article was adapted from a blog post by the Undercover Recruiter.